Twitter in journalism’s infrastructure

Tales of journalists using social media, and non-journalists committing acts of journalism using social tools, are starting to sound like stories of people using their telephones. Social media is becoming part of everyday communication for many people in general. Journalists rely on communication tools to get their job done. Does that mean that social networks like Twitter working their way into the infrastructure of today’s journalism?

I threw the question out – on Twitter of course – and here are some of the responses that I got back.

Roundup

  1. Kevin Sablan
    ksablan Is Twitter becoming part of journalism’s infrastructure? @ckanal @robquig @donlemoncnn @jeffpulver @danielhonigman @davewiner
  2. Chip Oglesby
  3. Matthew Peters
    schoolofold @ksablan For some people yes, but I don’t think it’s quite as widespread as those of us that are deep in it think.
  4. Sona Patel
    sona23 @ksablan It definitely is, though I think it’s coming to a point where papers focus on it too much and not enough on other tools.
  5. Daniel B. Honigman
    DanielHonigman @ksablan Not yet — it’s not paying the bills. Once Twitter traffic — and conversations — become monetized, then that’s a different story.
  6. Craig Kanalley
    ckanal @ksablan Not sure about Twitter specifically, but certainly SM & real-time Web are part of journalism now & there’s no going back IMO.

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Tribes

  1. Chip Oglesby
    cophotog @schoolofold @ksablan people will resist it the same as being web first. But will journo’s pick up on it before it loses it’s effectiveness?
  2. Kevin Sablan
    ksablan @cophotog They are picking up on it. Are you predicting Twitter will eventually lose its effectiveness?
  3. Matthew Peters
    schoolofold @cophotog @ksablan Who knows but if people think its just some silly trend that doesn’t apply to them, it’s their loss.
  4. Chip Oglesby
    cophotog @schoolofold @ksablan I think we’re starting to see the ‘tribalization’ of Twitter. People converse with smaller groups based on geography.
  5. Chip Oglesby
    cophotog @schoolofold @ksablan and I agree about the trend, but they aren’t use to an audience that can talk to themselves. They want to feel needed.
  6. Kevin Sablan
  7. Chip Oglesby
  8. Chip Oglesby
    cophotog @ksablan I want to do a heatmap that shows a users replies over time based on the physical location of the person they’re replying to.
  9. Kevin Sablan
    ksablan @cophotog That’s a great idea. It would be great to compare that to a person’s IRL conversations.

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Other tools

  1. Sona Patel
    sona23 @ksablan It definitely is, though I think it’s coming to a point where papers focus on it too much and not enough on other tools.
  2. Kevin Sablan
    ksablan @sona23 Good point. Focusing on the tool seems a little silly, really. When’s the last time we spoke this much about telephones?
  3. Sona Patel
    sona23 @ksablan Right. Building a strong online community requires attention to several areas: social media spaces, blogs, story comments, etc.

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Value

  1. Craig Kanalley
    ckanal @ksablan Not sure about Twitter specifically, but certainly SM & real-time Web are part of journalism now & there’s no going back IMO.
  2. Craig Kanalley
    ckanal @ksablan Twitter’s value is clear now, to me & many others such as yourself. But many people don’t see it; that could impact it long-term.
  3. Kevin Sablan
    ksablan @ckanal Agreed. I figured I would phrase the question more narrowly for a start of the discussion. Thanks for the reply, Craig.
  4. Craig Kanalley
    ckanal @ksablan Absolutely. Interested to read others’ responses & see where the conversation goes.

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Photo courtesy of Nathan Gibbs via Flickr.