Facebook Follow doesn’t follow its own definition

Banksy in Boston by Chris Devers licensed by CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Banksy in Boston by Chris Devers licensed by CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

NYU journalism professor Jay Rosen was upset yesterday about Facebook’s Follow function, which lets users see other people’s posts without becoming their friends. Rosen wrote a short Facebook post about how journalists and other “content creators” can’t tell which of their followers see their posts. “Facebook decides that. How is a mystery,” explains Rosen. “Relevance. Algorithm. Beyond that, you’re left clueless.”

More than 180,000 people follow Rosen on Facebook. Following is not the same as an email subscription, where each subscriber gets every message sent. Delivery of each post is at the mercy of the social network’s algorithms, so Rosen’s posts aren’t shown to all of his 180,000+ followers.

Facebook “busted” a deal with content creators, says Rosen. It’s a deal that he once understood to be:

“You don’t whine about working and producing for free, we give your stuff distribution to the people who have elected to receive it.”

I can’t confirm that such a deal was ever made, but here is an interesting entry from Facebook’s answer to the question, “What does it mean to follow someone?

Straight from the horse's mouth
Straight from the horse’s mouth

That looks like a subscription to me. Facebook’s definition doesn’t include a qualifier before “their posts.” It doesn’t say “some of their posts” or “many of their posts” or “a selection of their posts.” It says that I will see the posts of the people I’ve decided to follow.

What do you think? Did Facebook break its deal with you when you chose to Follow someone? Do you want to see every post from every person you Follow?

 

Facebook app, sans Messenger, can already read your text messages

Facebook’s mobile apps will soon stop supporting chat, and you’ll have to install and use its Messenger app if you want to continue messaging with your Facebook friends.

Some people are upset about this because they simply don’t like the new app, don’t want to be forced to bounce between two programs, or don’t like the messaging app’s required permissions.

Well, if you have Facebook’s current Android app, you already have given it permission to read all of your text messages, take a look at who has been calling you, and use GPS to track your location.

Below is a comparison of the the permissions required by Facebook and Facebook Messenger to access to your device’s location, text messaging, and phone information.

Compare the permissions that Facebook's two Android apps require.
Compare the permissions that Facebook’s two Android apps require.

The New York Times’ Molly Wood does a good job explaining how Facebook’s Apple apps ask for permissions as they are needed.

It’s important to understand that if you rely on apps and devices to connect you to other people, communities and organizations, those apps will require permissions to act on your behalf. You can easily uninstall the apps.

BufferApp’s scheduled Twitter links improve social consistency

Since this blog is about linking, it’s pretty important (to maintain some consistent branding with all five of my readers who also follow me on social networks) that I use Twitter to share links. Since I started using BufferApp to schedule my tweets, I get a friendly reminder via email whenever I have no tweets scheduled to post, and I think it had improved my tweeting.

BufferApp is basically a button on my browser. It’s a button I press whenever I come across a web page that I think my followers might like. Pressing that button brings up a window in which I compose a tweet with a shortened link. Instead of going out to the twitterverse immediately, the message is added to a “buffer” that BufferApp will send out one of the 9 times that I’ve already chosen in my settings. If BufferApp runs out of tweets to send, it sends me that email to remind me to add more tweets to the queue.

For me, that email might be the key to BufferApp’s success. It really annoys me. It annoys me like my boss annoys me when she bugs me about an overdue project (that polling page is almost done, Terry). It annoys me like I annoy my children when I have to remind them again to do their chores.

I hate that email so much that I work harder than ever to scan my Google Reader in the morning and fill my BufferApp with links. That’s right, that annoying email has basically made me a more consistent tweeter.

If you aren’t too proud to see if being treated like a child can sometimes be an effective time management tool, give BufferApp a try and let me know what you think.

Empire Avenue makes team social metrics fun

Screen shot of Empire Avenue home page

If you manage multiple social network accounts for clients, or if you a have a team of workers who are tasked with being socially active, you’ve probably surveyed various tools to monitor the performance those accounts.

Empire Avenue is not billed as a social metrics tool, but after playing it for a week I became more aware of what some of my friends were doing on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Flickr and LinkedIn. That’s exactly what I would need if I managed a team of customer service reps, reporters or social media account managers.

At its most basic level, Empire Ave is a stock market simulator in which you build virtual wealth by investing in social people. From Empire:

Every day, you’re on Twitter, talking to friends on Facebook, uploading videos or photos, and writing blog posts. Just for doing that stuff, you’ll earn Eaves – our virtual currency – and we’ll dish out some more virtual cash to your shareholders.

So you gain wealth when the people you invest in engage in social activities. There’s a whole lot more to the game, but the basics are enough to show how easy this game can be used to evaluate and manage your company’s social activity.

  1. Get your whole team to create an Empire account and connect their social accounts.
  2. Invest in those team members and no one else. At first, invest in each member equally.
  3. Check your portfolio every day. If you gain wealth then you know your team is being social.
  4. Sort your portfolio by “gainers” and reward those team members for a job well done.
  5. Sort your portfolio by “losers” and coach those colleagues to become more social.

The biggest challenge I see is that Empire Avenue might be too fun. Since beginning, I’ve divested in my friends (sorry) and transferred those funds into accounts with a higher return.

Oh yeah, another challenge is that your share price isn’t determined exclusively by your social activity. Your price also goes up if people buy more shares of you. So … go to http://empireavenue.com/?t=fvcx1nr0 and add (e)KSABLAN to your portfolio!

Here are a couple of links to get you started in the game: